Lemon verbena

Aloysia triphylla | Also known as: Lemon plant, Verbena oil plant, Lemon scented verbena, Sweet scented verbena, Lippia citriodora, Aloysia citriodora | Rating: 1 votes | Print / Pdf

Lemon verbena, makes a great ingredient to add to cocktails and provides you with three metre tall foliage to hide behind when drinking.

Aloysia triphylla or lemon verbena grows up to three metres in height. It gets the name lemon verbena due to the fact that the leaves give off a lemon scent when crushed. The leaves are long with a pointed tip, growing to around 8cm in length. They are a bright green colour and have a slightly rough texture. The pretty small flowers grow in sprays and are a pale purple or white colour, growing on purple stems. This plant is native to Argentina and Bolivia. It was introduced to Europe in the 17th Century by the Spanish and Portugese. These leaves are great for cooking with, adding a lemon flavour to many dishes; it's especially great with fish.

Rate it:
Plant
Known dangers?
  • no
Height [m]
  • 3
Spread [m]
  • 3
Dominant flower colour
  • Violet
Flower Fragrance
  • Yes, let it smell
Flowering seasons
  • Late summer
Foliage in spring
  • Green
Foliage in summer
  • Green
Awards?
  • Yes, let it smell
Propagation methods
  • softwood cuttings
Growth habit
  • Clump-forming
  • Erect
Environment
Acidity
  • Acidic
  • Neutral
  • Alkaline
Hardiness zone
  • Z8-11
Heat zone
  • H12-8
Winter temperatures [°C]
  • -12 - 4
Heat days
  • 90 - 210
Moisture
  • well-drained
Soil type
  • sandy
  • chalky
  • loams
Sun requirements
  • Full sun
Exposure
  • Sheltered
Usage
Standard category
  • Exotic, house plants & other
  • House plants
Grown for
  • Ornamental Foliage
Creative category
  • Kid Approved
  • Fine fragrants
  • For Beginners
  • For birds & bees
  • Author's choice
Garden type
  • Indoor or winter garden
  • Cottage garden
  • Containers
  • City
  • Mediterranean garden
Garden spaces
  • Flower beds
  • Walls, trellises and pergolas
  • Borders
Gardening expertise
  • beginner
Time to reach full size
  • up to 10 years