Peace lily

Spathiphyllum wallisii | Also known as: White sails | Rating: 2 votes | Print / Pdf

Elegant blossoms and lush greenery, there is a lot that explains exactly why spathiphyllum wallisii is such a highly desirable houseplant. A tender evergreen perennial, its foliage comprises large, lance-shaped, glossy dark green leaves, while its remarkable spring floral display stands tall on long slender stems. Not your typical blossoms, the stems produce rich yellow cylindrical spadix, which are protected on one side by a broad milk-white spathe. Commonly known as the peace lily, the spathe’s resemblance to a sail earns it the alternative name, white sails. It is best grown indoors in loam-based compost, in high humidity and filtered light. Water and mist regularly, and add balanced liquid fertilizer monthly. Outdoors, grow in frost-free areas in partial shade. No pruning is required

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Plant
Known dangers?
  • yes
Dangers: comments
  • Avoid eating this plant, or you may have mild stomach upset. Its sap may irritate your skin.
Height [m]
  • 0.65
Spread [m]
  • 0.5
Dominant flower colour
  • White
Flower Fragrance
  • No, neutral please
Flowering seasons
  • Early spring
  • Mid spring
  • Late spring
  • Early summer
  • Mid summer
  • Late summer
Foliage in spring
  • Green
Foliage in summer
  • Green
Foliage in Autumn
  • Green
Foliage in winter
  • Green
Propagation methods
  • seed
  • division
Growth habit
  • Arching
  • Suckering
Environment
Acidity
  • Acidic
  • Neutral
  • Alkaline
Hardiness zone
  • Z14-15
Heat zone
  • H12-1
Heat days
  • 0 - 210
Moisture
  • well-drained
  • well-drained but frequently watered
Soil type
  • loams
Sun requirements
  • Partial shade
  • Full shade
Exposure
  • Sheltered
Usage
Standard category
  • Exotic, house plants & other
  • House plants
Grown for
  • Attractive flowers and foliage
Creative category
  • For Beginners
  • We love the dark
  • Colours
Garden type
  • Indoor or winter garden
Garden spaces
  • Shade
  • Borders
Gardening expertise
  • beginner
Time to reach full size
  • up to 10 years