Why gardening should be a solitary pursuit!

by Natasha Starkell | 23.07.2013 | lemon , chopping , garden | 0 comments | Rating: 0 votes

Why gardening should be a solitary pursuit!

Why gardening should be a solitary pursuit!

A couple of days ago I went upstairs to find my partner randomly chopping leaves off our potted lemon tree with a pair of kitchen scissors!

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A couple of days ago I went upstairs to find my partner randomly chopping leaves off our potted lemon tree with a pair of kitchen scissors!

He declared it too messy and wanted it to turn into a bush. I was filled with an inordinate amount of rage, for several reasons.

a) He was not using the correct tools. The scissors were for cutting baking paper and string, not herbaceous goods. Despite this he managed to achieve his aim, but It was Not Right. Anything could have happened - poisonous sap could have got stuck in the scissor pivot and contaminated future bacon sandwich preparation. The blades could have blunted and lead to a domestic kitchen incident. He could have cut the stems in an Incorrect Manner which might lead to all sorts of things almost unimaginable to me as I am not yet an Accomplished Gardener.

b) He had not researched his approach, but just deployed a random hacking technique. The plant had not been trimmed (?) since its planting a year or so ago and was growing healthily but widely. It turns out he wanted it to grow into a Bush Shape. So after macerating most of its healthy stems, he’s now stuck a stake down the middle and I’ve tied the one remaining stem up to that. It now looks tall, but skeletal.

c) I’d wanted to do it.

And therein probably lies the real rub. Who owns the plants in a joint household?

In the garden, after a few tense months of confusion and miscommunication, we have come to a general agreement that we have different zones to look after. I do raised beds and flowery stuff, while he does cordons (fruit trees grown in regular lines) and vegetables. We potter about at separate times, occasionally giving the other’s zones a grudging look. The only thing we both enjoy is mowing the lawn (yes, seriously), so we scrap about who gets to do that, and have healthy debates about the height of the blade.

The reason I got so agitated about the incident of the lemon tree was that it basically encapsulated my failures as a human being:

- procrastinating on tasks, under the guise of doing comprehensive research on how to get the job done in the most optimum way

- procrastinating on tasks, under the guise of not having the correct tools

- procrastinating on tasks, when I basically don’t know what I’m doing

- wanting to control everything.

Anyway, the Deed is Done and we shall wait to see what happens to the lemon tree.

Unfortunately in my rage, I declared that I would officially take on responsibility for its partner, the orange tree, which is looking really sick and weedy, and I would do so by tomorrow, otherwise the sky would fall on my head. So that’s my job for Thursday.

After visiting the garden centre for a new pair of secateurs.

 

Photocredit: (under CC attribution license)

Lonely lemon: Darwin Bell on Flickr

Lemon Tree:  Jenn Khoury on Flickr

 


Natasha Starkell
Written by Natasha Starkell

Working mum, struggling with gardening chores.

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