Suspend your belief. And your flowers.

by zoe | 08.04.2014 | art , design , flowers , rebecca law | 0 comments | Rating: 1 votes

Rebecca Law

Rebecca Law

Rebecca Law

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Forget the hanging gardens of Babylon: Rebecca Louise Law takes hanging flowers to a whole new level.

Imagine that it starts raining flowers. Hundreds and hundreds of beautiful, colourful flowers, pouring down from the sky. And then, suddenly, the flower shower is paused and the flowers are left hanging, suspended in mid-air. You are now probably imagining something similar to one of Rebecca Louise Law’s installations.

Rebecca Louise Law is a London-based floral installation artist who has been working with flowers for over 17 years. She is best known for her interactive large-scale installations of hanging flowers, mostly in urban environments. All the hanging installations use fresh flowers that are allowed to dry over time, enabling the viewer to consider natural changes, what is valuable and how long that value lasts. Rebecca has exhibited in a variety of public spaces as well as having made installations for fashion brands like Hermes and Gucci.

Rebecca Law

Rebecca Law

A Totem

Rebecca Law A Totem
Rebecca Law

Rebecca Law

Hanging Flowers

Rebecca Law Hanging Flowers
Rebecca Law

Rebecca Law

A Chandelier

Rebecca Law A Chandelier

Rebecca’s love of using flowers in her artwork started because of the colours and smells of the flowers, and she has grown to appreciate the challenges of working with such an ephemeral material. “I’m fascinated by my work changing over time,” she says, “I am constantly learning about how to use flowers and they often surprise me, as one slight change in the environment can completely change an installation.”

It is of no surprise to Rebecca that she ended up using flowers in her artwork; it’s in her roots - her father is the head gardener of a National Trust property and her nana and aunt were artists who painted and pressed flowers.

Rebecca’s Installation ‘The Flower Garden Display’d’ is currently on display at The Garden Museum in London. Join her and photographer Rachel Warne for a discussion about the beauty of decay, dying flowers and the aftermath of gardens on 15 April.


zoe
Written by zoe

I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree - Joyce Kilmer (1913)

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