Wallflower pruning made easy

by Natasha Starkell | 27.03.2014 | 2 steps | easy | 5 Min. | 4 times | Rating: 3 votes

If you own wallflowers and it is not a CD, then you must prune them. A.k.a erysimum, these perennial flowers should be pruned in late winter. Deadheading (which has no connection with the Grateful Dead groupies) is also essential to prolong growth.

Erysimum, also known as wallflowers, are a large plant family that contain annual, biennial and perennial varieties. Apricot Twist and Bowles Mauve are just two types that are great plants for the garden because they’re perennial and have extremely long flowering periods. However, if you have these plants, you’ll know that they can get very woody. This means that you need to be ready to prune them.

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Prune wallflowers in late winter

Prune wallflowers in late winter

Prune wallflowers in late winter

Step 1

Prune wallflowers in late winter

Erysimum are good at flowering throughout the year, so it can be difficult to establish just when to prune them. One of the best times is in the late winter before the new growing year starts. Even if there are flowers still in bloom, cutting back is a good idea, otherwise your plant may become extremely large, woody and top heavy.

Using a sharp pair of secateurs, cut back stems to a cluster of healthy shoots on the last summer’s growth. You can do this for all flowering stalks, reducing your wallflower’s size by two to three centimetres.

Be aware that Erysimum plants don’t respond well to heavy pruning, and are unlikely to grow from old wood. 

Image source: Some rights reserved by Lettuce.

Items:
Schöterich, Goldlack Erysimum Bronze
2.99 €
Schöterich, Goldlack Erysimum Winter Sorbet
2.99 €
Goldlack Sugar Rush F1 Hybride - NEU
1.99 €
Deadhead to prolong flowering

Deadhead to prolong flowering

Deadhead to prolong flowering

Step 2

Deadhead to prolong flowering

In addition, you should remove faded flower stems throughout the year to encourage new buds to form.

Take each flower stem in your hand and trace the stalk back to a pair of leaves. Use a sharp pair of secateurs to completely remove the flower. Continue the process until you’ve removed all flower stalks.

Image source: Some rights reserved by jerryoldenettel

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